What’s a Library for?

What’s a Library for?  Scott Silverman

See on Scoop.itGIBSIccURATION

What’s a library for?   Are there any contributions academic libraries in particular have left to make to the shaping of critical thinking? I will not say I have a comprehensive answer. I cannot even say that I have an original answer. But I am certain that libraries are more relevant to and prominent in the knowledge eco-system than ever. Conventional wisdom holds that books—once the almost exclusive object of critical thinking—are losing luster and utility; with content becoming a commodity anyone can access (often at high cost), the local efforts of librarians should shift to the unique, to special collections and archives. I agree that treasured materials require and deserve intensive effort. Despite the relentless, wholly commendable expansion of digitization, physical books are not being rushed headlong to the dustbin of history, and librarians are partnering with—sometimes prodding—authors and publishers to achieve a comprehensive copyright, economic and technological environment working to the mutual advantage of creators, scholars and learners.

But education is fundamentally a process, and libraries can do more to further the inter-dependent exchange between teachers and students than merely provide resources. While great academic libraries can and should house intellectually enriching special collections that are secure, conserved and accessible, the library should also be a key campus place in which study and technology meet to nurture learned citizenship. Library leaders need to facilitate allocation of substantial space for group study while providing as many contemplative areas.

KISs @GIBS‘s insight:

Scott Silverman blogs – ” . . . Are there any contributions academic libraries in particular have left to make to the shaping of critical thinking? I will not say I have a comprehensive answer. I cannot even say that I have an original answer. But I am certain that libraries are more relevant to and prominent in the knowledge eco-system than ever. Conventional wisdom holds that books—once the almost exclusive object of critical thinking—are losing luster and utility; with content becoming a commodity anyone can access (often at high cost), the local efforts of librarians should shift to the unique, to special collections and archives. I agree that treasured materials require and deserve intensive effort. Despite the relentless, wholly commendable expansion of digitization, physical books are not being rushed headlong to the dustbin of history, and librarians are partnering with—sometimes prodding—authors and publishers to achieve a comprehensive copyright, economic and technological environment working to the mutual advantage of creators, scholars and learners.”

See on scottsilvermanistryingtothink.wordpress.com

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