Greasing the wheels of the Internet economy / bcg.perspectives

Report – bcgperspectives.com

Digitally driven economic growth continues to be one of the few bright spots in a sluggish global economy. Reducing or eliminating numerous factors that inhibit online interactions and exchange could cause this growth to be even faster and could have an even bigger impact. To better understand these sources of “e-friction” and how they constrain economic activity, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) commissioned The Boston Consulting Group to prepare this independent report. The results have been discussed with ICANN executives, but BCG is responsible for the analysis and conclusions.

GIBS Information Centre / GIBSIC‘s insight:

e-friction :”Most of these sources of friction are found at the national or local level. They are related to infrastructure, access, cost, and outdated regulations; they are the result of the inability of consumers and businesses to get online and engage with content effectively because of inadequate education, training, or resources; and they are imposed by governments in the form of restrictions on certain forms of content. Some sources of friction are more fundamental in nature than others.

As the Internet has come to play an increasingly prominent role in more and more aspects of economic and social life, it has ignited a debate in many countries over the extent to which certain elements of digital infrastructure, commerce, discourse, and interaction should be brought under greater government control. Some are even talking of the need to turn certain elements of the Internet inward, for example, by determining the location of key servers and routing personal data with greater consideration for national or regional boundaries.

Most of these sources of friction are found at the national or local level. They are related to infrastructure, access, cost, and outdated regulations; they are the result of the inability of consumers and businesses to get online and engage with content effectively because of inadequate education, training, or resources; and they are imposed by governments in the form of restrictions on certain forms of content. Some sources of friction are more fundamental in nature than others.

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