Staplercide! The senseless murder of the Library Stapler

On a recent visit to leading Business School Libraries in the United States, I could not help but smile at their rows of staplers lining the reference desks.  It felt like home. We were not alone.

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Harvard Business School Library – Staples Reading Room

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Columbia Business School Watson Library 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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GIBS Information Centre

 

This morning I got this article in my Inbox – Staplercide! by Jason Vance.  Well worth a read – gives good insight (with a smile) into the life cycle of the stapler and student behavior. I was rather surprised to read the students at Indiana University Law library using their feet to get staples through thick packs (this happened in 2000 – maybe they’ve evolved).  Why I was surprised, I don’t know, because our students are not far off – our staplers usually get attacked with fists.

Long live the Library Stapler!!!!

 

In Praise of Traditional Libraries

Some librarians like to disparage something they call the “traditional library.” The reasons vary depending on circumstances, and understanding the criticism is made more difficult because no one seems to agree on what a “traditional library” is.

This article speaks of traditional libraries rather than “the traditional library” because libraries vary widely, and the only fair way to discuss academic libraries is in generalities. There might be one single library somewhere that would embody everything “traditional,” but most libraries are amalgamations of changes over time. It’s only by looking at the whole that we can make such general statements about libraries.

Traditional academic libraries discovered problems and solved them, adapting to the demands of new scholarship, embracing new media of communication, and developing appropriate organizational and cooperative schemes, in a steady march of progress over the course of the twentieth century away from the tiny, inaccessible, and inadequate historical libraries that had preceded them.

Perhaps, as some now say, the traditional library is dead, which is not so, given the enormous benefit traditional libraries have provided for research and education in the country over the past century. If it is so, whatever replaces them is as successful at collecting information, organizing it, and making it as accessible and useful as possible to scholars and students as traditional libraries were. They were good things, traditional libraries, and we will miss them when they’re gone.

GIBS Information Centre / GIBSIC‘s insight:

Long live libraries!!!

See on lj.libraryjournal.com

CCK launches ICT centres in ten libraries – Telecompaper

See on Scoop.itCentre for Business Analysis & Research – CBAR

CCK launches ICT centres in ten libraries Telecompaper (subscription) The Communications Commission of Kenya (CCK), in partnership with the Kenya National Library Services (KNLS), has launched an e-Resource Centres project at the Werugha Community…

See on www.telecompaper.com

What is researcher wellbeing and how can we manage and nurture it?

See on Scoop.itBusiness education

Staying a productive, sane and sociable researcher is no mean feat, says Charlotte Morris, but you don’t have to go it alone (RT @Prof_GD_Foster: Staying a productive, sane & sociable researcher is no mean feat, says Charlotte Morris,you don’t…

See on www.guardian.co.uk

What’s a Library for?

What’s a Library for?  Scott Silverman

See on Scoop.itGIBSIccURATION

What’s a library for?   Are there any contributions academic libraries in particular have left to make to the shaping of critical thinking? I will not say I have a comprehensive answer. I cannot even say that I have an original answer. But I am certain that libraries are more relevant to and prominent in the knowledge eco-system than ever. Conventional wisdom holds that books—once the almost exclusive object of critical thinking—are losing luster and utility; with content becoming a commodity anyone can access (often at high cost), the local efforts of librarians should shift to the unique, to special collections and archives. I agree that treasured materials require and deserve intensive effort. Despite the relentless, wholly commendable expansion of digitization, physical books are not being rushed headlong to the dustbin of history, and librarians are partnering with—sometimes prodding—authors and publishers to achieve a comprehensive copyright, economic and technological environment working to the mutual advantage of creators, scholars and learners.

But education is fundamentally a process, and libraries can do more to further the inter-dependent exchange between teachers and students than merely provide resources. While great academic libraries can and should house intellectually enriching special collections that are secure, conserved and accessible, the library should also be a key campus place in which study and technology meet to nurture learned citizenship. Library leaders need to facilitate allocation of substantial space for group study while providing as many contemplative areas.

KISs @GIBS‘s insight:

Scott Silverman blogs – ” . . . Are there any contributions academic libraries in particular have left to make to the shaping of critical thinking? I will not say I have a comprehensive answer. I cannot even say that I have an original answer. But I am certain that libraries are more relevant to and prominent in the knowledge eco-system than ever. Conventional wisdom holds that books—once the almost exclusive object of critical thinking—are losing luster and utility; with content becoming a commodity anyone can access (often at high cost), the local efforts of librarians should shift to the unique, to special collections and archives. I agree that treasured materials require and deserve intensive effort. Despite the relentless, wholly commendable expansion of digitization, physical books are not being rushed headlong to the dustbin of history, and librarians are partnering with—sometimes prodding—authors and publishers to achieve a comprehensive copyright, economic and technological environment working to the mutual advantage of creators, scholars and learners.”

See on scottsilvermanistryingtothink.wordpress.com

10 Great Technology Initiatives for Your Library

See on Scoop.itGIBSIccURATION

Today’s hottest web and mobile technologies are offering libraries a new world of opportunities to engage patrons. Ultra-popular social media websites and apps combined with the availability of affordable cloud-based services and the evolution and adoption of mobile devices are enabling librarians to share and build communities, store and analyze large collections of data, create digital collections, and access information and services in ways never thought about before.

Libraries have become technology leaders by integrating cutting-edge tools to enhance users’ experience. It’s not enough to redesign the library website. Best practices mean developing user personas and following usability strategies to produce user-informed designs. New digital collections are stored in the cloud and mobile applications are developed around them. Libraries are claiming their venues on location-based mobile social networks, developing bleeding-edge augmented reality applications, and participating in semantic web efforts.

Forward-thinking librarians are actively experimenting with and incorporating these new technologies into their digital strategies. Here are 10 ideas for you to leverage today’s most innovative tools and techniques:

http://americanlibrariesmagazine.org/features/02192013/10-great-technology-initiatives-your-library

 

All of these come straight from The Tech Set #11–20 series (ALA TechSource, June 2012).

ChezINFO!‘s insight:

"Libraries have become technology leaders by integrating cutting-edge tools to enhance users’ experience. It’s not enough to redesign the library website. Best practices mean developing user personas and following usability strategies to produce user-informed designs. New digital collections are stored in the cloud and mobile applications are developed around them. Libraries are claiming their venues on location-based mobile social networks, developing bleeding-edge augmented reality applications, and participating in semantic web efforts. . . .  10 ideas for you to leverage today’s most innovative tools and techniques:

http://americanlibrariesmagazine.org/features/02192013/10-great-technology-initiatives-your-library

See on americanlibrariesmagazine.org

25 of the most beautiful college libraries in the world

See on Scoop.itGIBSIccURATION

Whether ornate or modern, digital or dusty, the library is in many ways the epicenter of a campus – at least for some students. It is at once a shining emblem of vast, acquirable knowledge, a place for deep discussions and meetings of the mind, and of course, a big building full of books, which is exciting enough.

From Portugal to France to Boston here are 25 of the most beautiful college libraries in the world: http://becauseimaddicted.net/2012/01/25-of-most-beautiful-college-libraries.html

ChezINFO!‘s insight:

… the library is in many ways the epicentre of a campus . . . visit KISs @GIBS campus Illovo

See on becauseimaddicted.net

The Best Fictional Libraries in Pop Culture

See on Scoop.itGIBSIccURATION

Here at Flavorpill, we’re always on the lookout for a great library — even if that library happens to be fictional. So we’ve sifted through literature, film, and television to bring you ten of the…

 

Here are ten of the best libraries ever imagined~ the best fictional libraries in pop culture, from films like Sandman, Harry Potter, Doctor Who, Star Wars, and Beauty and the Beast, and many others: http://flavorwire.com/366500/the-best-fictional-libraries-in-pop-culture/view-all

ChezINFO!‘s insight:

Films :  Sandman, Harry Potter, Doctor Who, Star Wars, and Beauty and the Beast

See on flavorwire.com