IoD Connect – Doing business in Africa

GIBS Information Centre / GIBSIC‘s insight:

IoD Director General: ” . . .Africa’s growth over the last decade has been driven almost entirely by the extractive industries, and it’s been concentrated in the hands of a few at the very top. For too many Africans, the commodities boom remains something they’re aware of, rather than something they’re part of. The notion that another decade of extractive industry will simply pull millions out of poverty is a flawed one. The 2013 Africa Progress Report sets out the case quite clearly, saying:


“Too many extractive industries operate as enclaves insulated from the national economy. They create few jobs and have weak linkages to local firms or people. They add little in value production.”

There are encouraging changes taking place in this area, not least a move towards greater transparency. This is not a buzz word or an empty phrase to be found in the pages of a corporate brochure. Or if it is, it shouldn’t be.  –  Transparency is the new competition – driving up standards, engaging communities, creating a level playing field from which all companies stand to gain. If my first recommendation is that every company, big or small, leads by example, my second plea is that transparency becomes the new normal at the heart of all commercial enterprise.”


See on www.iod.com

Africa’s rising risks jeopardizing recent mining growth: report

Analysts claim Sub-Saharan Africa’s investment environment is deteriorating.

GIBS Information Centre / GIBSIC‘s insight:

risk and resilience – ” . . . 6th annual Global Risks and Resilience Atlas (GRRA), which features 36 threat indices used to identify emerging global risks related dangers to business in 179 countries, Maplecroft experts say 30% of the African economies more at risk this year than in 2012 and last year.  –  Fifteen nations of Sub-Saharan Africa, a term that refers to all the continent with the exception of the northern countries – Egypt, Libya, Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco and Western Sahara, show a significant increase in their risks levels over the last three years.

See on www.mining.com

Safest Emerging Markets Banks 2013 | Global Finance

Global Finance presents its annual ranking of the soundest banks in the developing world

GIBS Information Centre / GIBSIC‘s insight:

EM banks – “Outside South Africa, rating coverage of banks in sub-Saharan Africa remains small, and only South African institutions hold investment-grade ratings.

 

HOW WE MEASURE THE SAFETY OF BANKS

 The safest banks chart compares the ratings for the world’s largest 500 banks, based on asset size. Long-term foreign currency ratings issued by Fitch Ratings, Standard & Poor’s and Moody’s Investors Service were used. Where possible, ratings on holding companies were used rather than operating companies, and banks that are wholly owned by other banks were omitted. Within each rank set, banks are rated according to asset size, based on data for the most recent annual reporting period provided by Fitch Solutions and Moody’s. In previous years we assigned a “tie” score to banks that had the same number of points and had assets within $5 billion of each other. We have changed our methodology on this point and will no longer be giving “ties.” Ratings are reproduced with permission from the three ratings agencies, with all rights reserved. A rating is not a recommendation to purchase, sell or hold a security, and it does not comment on market price or suitability for a particular investor.


Under Creative Commons License: Attribution Share Alike

See on www.gfmag.com